Empowering Your Citizen Developers: How to Do More with Many

Empowering Your Citizen Developers: How to Do More with Many

What are Citizen Developers?

The term “citizen developer” has been around for quite some time, however it became more prominent over the last few years when organisations started to go through a digital transformation.

The term citizen developer describes highly creative and driven problems solvers in the enterprise who engage in the development of business applications using out-of-box and low-code tools. They typically create self-service business applications, used internally within their organisation.

This type of person usually doesn’t have formal programming training and application development isn’t part of their job. However, they do have solid knowledge and expertise in the specific areas of their business. They’re creative and able to come up with ideas which improve internal operations, so when they’re given technical tools that involve minimal coding—or even none, for the first iteration of their project—they often get results. Fast!

Why you should embrace Citizen Developers

Better utilise your front-line knowledge and skills

Employees that are on the front line of departments and involved in the daily “job to be done” are in the perfect position to spot opportunities for business process improvements.

These improvements can be as simple as reducing inefficiencies and increasing productivity by transforming a paper-based form into an online form.

The perfect example of low-code tools that citizen developers create major impact with is Microsoft Forms and Microsoft Flow. Non-technical users quickly grasp enough to create simple approval workflows, which they use to avoid time-consuming “follow-up” requests. Once users understand what technology is available to them and how easily they can automate some of their repetitive daily activities, they feel empowered to learn more and their ability with the tools increases. Best of all, the knowledge specific to them and their department is utilised to a greater extent for the organisation as a whole.

Drive innovation within the organisation

In today’s world, every organisation is an IT business—even if they’re not a tech company. It’s impossible for them to survive without a high reliance on technology.

By providing low-code tools to employees and encouraging them to use their critical thinking and creativity, you unlock a source of innovation directly concerned with day-to-day activities. While the results are often more tactical than strategic, the impact can be significant. Particularly since the people involved and their perspective may be entirely untapped.

This mindset and engagement with front-line staff is also attractive to prospective employees who are looking for innovative organisations to join.

Streamline digital transformation

Digital transformation is a very challenging, ongoing activity which affects all enterprises. There is lots of pressure on IT departments to roll out new technologies that help achieve higher return on investment. Having employees outside the IT department that can build low-code solutions supports the digitisation process and reduces operational expenses.

Improve productivity

Having an extra set of hands always helps. IT departments are not always in a position to understand and improve all the business processes they’re expected to support.

For example, many organisations still use paper-based forms which, once completed, need to be reviewed and signed off by multiple stakeholders. To turn that into an on-line process, you need a deep understanding of the workflow itself and how it relates to the department and people it touches. It can take a lot of effort for an IT department to familiarize themselves with those kinds of requirements, but a citizen developer knows them already.

Digitising simple, paper-based forms is often the first positive impact citizen developers have on overall productivity.

How to support your Citizen Developers

Training and mentoring

Citizen developers are already tech-savvy and motivated individuals, but they still need support and training to further improve their skill sets. They inevitably grow more confident with encouragement and look for new technologies to learn. Effective IT departments mentor their citizen developers with programs sponsored by the organisation’s decision-makers.

Governance

IT departments should provide citizen developers with governance models that include application lifecycle management. These governance models not only encourage iterative improvements to the applications being created; they also provide a means for the organisation to focus development effort on areas that will see the most benefit.

Continued support

CIOs and IT Managers should communicate the initiatives delivered by citizen developers to the rest of the organisation. This kind of broad recognition fosters a workplace culture that supports their professional growth—as individuals and as a group—and the ongoing innovation they create.

Summary

Overall, supporting citizen developers comes with noticeable benefits, such as reduced operational cost, improved productivity and better alignment between IT and the business. Organisations who invest in citizen developers will have a wide calibre of people to support their digital transformation. While IT departments focus on delivering complex solutions, citizen developers will deliver quick wins with positive impact.

Preferred Parterner Announcement

Engage Squared Recognised as “Microsoft Preferred Partner” for Business Applications

Microsoft Preferred Partner for SharePoint Business Applications Microsoft SharePoint Business Applications Partner Program Charter Member PowerApps Flow SharePoint Microsoft Teams

Joins exclusive ranks as a “Charter Member” in the Microsoft 365 Business Applications Partner Program – one of just 37 companies worldwide and the only Australian consultancy to make the list.

Engage Squared is excited to be recognised for our innovative work with PowerApps, SharePoint, Microsoft Teams and Flow.

As a preferred partner, Engage Squared has access to Microsoft resources that will help us deliver even more effective digital workplace solutions to our customers. These resources include connections to Microsoft advisors, access to product roadmap information that informs the technology strategies underpinning our implementations, and exclusive technical knowledge bases.

We’re particularly excited by this program because it reinforces the value we see in Microsoft’s holistic approach to technology solutions – deploying the power of Microsoft 365 to achieve easy to implement automation, applications and knowledge management.

Seen from a product perspective, these three things map to Microsoft Flow, PowerApps and Power BI (which create the “Business Applications”, in Microsoft parlance) and SharePoint (which provides the knowledge management). When we combine these approaches into a single solution, rather than leaving them siloed within distinct projects, we can fuel transformative business change.

Case Study: ATO

Productivity soars as ATO wins back 55,000 hours a year with “Intranet Accelerator”

In the words of our CEO, Stephen Monk: “It’s gratifying to be recognised by Microsoft for our innovative work with business applications.

We believe when you make people’s work lives more enjoyable and productive, you make their organisation stronger and more effective. It’s extremely rewarding to work with Microsoft’s app technologies because they can solve so many different problems so quickly. 

We’ve helped our customers implement solutions ranging from a PowerApps engagement that saved more than three days of effort every week, to more holistic solutions streamlining a diverse range of business processes—such as front-line health and safety, procurement and the project management and delivery of portfolios worth billions of dollars. 

It’s exhilarating to be part of this program and to continue working closely with Microsoft in solving new business problems as they emerge. Having exclusive access to the Microsoft product team is particularly rewarding. 

“Combining powerful technologies to solve problems for people is why we’re here. It’s about bringing people and technology together.”

Case Study: Aboriginal Legal Service

Connecting and Empowering Community Legal Workers with Office 365 


“Our community teams now have a system that will radically improve their efficiency as they deliver services and work with Aboriginal community members in our 26 locations across NSW and ACT”

– Michael Higgins, Chief Operating Officer, Aboriginal Legal Service

Banner - UAT Testing

Doing UAT Right

Of all forms of testing, user acceptance testing is often the most essential to get right. Why? Because it saves you money. Too often I find organisations underprepared for the task of doing UAT properly and I believe this is largely due to the organisation not knowing the true impact of NOT doing UAT properly.

In 2017, IBM found the cost to fix a bug found after a build was 4 to 5 times higher1 than if the bug had been found in the design phase. More alarmingly, it was 100 times higher if the bug was found after deployment to production.

diagram cost of bug fixing over stages

4 Steps to getting UAT right

  1. Define your UAT team
    It’s important to avoid restricting your UAT team to project team members. The most important group to include in UAT testing is the “real” end users of your solution. And the key word here is ‘users’. This is crucial because they’re the people who will use the solution daily. Every persona and stakeholder group should be included, which means that people from each group should be selected to join the UAT team. Prepare that UAT team early and enable focused UAT to happen by booking in the UAT resources ahead of time. Consider booking time in your UAT team’s schedule to enable them to adequately perform UAT.
  2. Confirm test cases and acceptance criteria
    Agree upon user stories and their acceptance criteria during the design phase of your project. Each user story should cover a specific use case or scenario of the solution and therefore lends itself to being turned into test cases for your UAT. The test cases are normally a set of actions which the UAT team member can carry out to verify if the solution has worked as intended. The acceptance criteria define what is considered to be “working” in the solution.
  3. Develop a UAT plan Consider the following when writing your plan:
    • When will UAT start and finish?
      – It is important that a finite date is applied to the UAT period to avoid perpetual testing.
    • How will the test results be collected?
      – Write down how the communication between your project team and your UAT team will take place while testing. Doing this prevents the project team from the nightmare of receiving emails, word documents, spreadsheets, screenshots (or no screenshots) and endless discussions through email and other channels.
      – Collecting and managing bugs in a central repository will also mitigate the risk of duplication of bugs, as well as assist with the management of bugs through the correction and retesting process.
    • How will you label any bugs found (bugs, feature-requests, usability, training, etc.)
    • Who will triage the results?
      Remember: the triage process can bury you. Plan ahead and appoint someone to manage the triage and confirmation of defects.
  4. Conduct UAT
    Provide the UAT team with the list of test cases (as demonstrated in table1 below) as well as for instructions about how to log a bug well (i.e. the bugs should include the account used for testing, the device used for testing, screenshots, URLs, description of how to reproduce, etc.). Consider holding a UAT ‘briefing session’ to take the UAT team through what is expected of them throughout the UAT period.
    With the UAT plan in place and the UAT team readied for the task, the UAT can begin with the tests being performed and the results recorded. Were the tests successful, or did defects result? Any bugs raised then need to be triaged, confirmed as defects, corrected and re-tested.

    Table1 – Sample UAT test caseSample test case:
    As a user, I can see news on the home page
    ID Acceptance criteria description Pass/Fail/other Comments
    1234 Verify that you can see a news carousel on the homepage
    1234 Verify that the news carousel auto rotates
    1234 Verify that you can click on a news image and be taken to the news page
    1234 Verify that when you click on the navigation arrows in the carousel, the image displayed changes.
  5. Close and sign off UAT
    Once all testing is complete and all bugs are corrected, the project team should conduct a UAT closure meeting. During the meeting, you should look to tie up any loose ends, and formally close the testing period. Signing off or closing the UAT period means that you can move your solution into production.

Many development teams, including Engage Squared, apply an agile approach to projects with continuous integration and continuous testing. Agile’s incremental approach allows more feedback, flexibility, and of course testing, so that every time a feature, fix, or function is added or changed in the code it’s checked for bugs. In turn, we have found this helps avoid preventable bugs – ultimately saving time and money.

 


1 https://www.researchgate.net/figure/IBM-System-Science-Institute-Relative-Cost-of-Fixing-Defects_fig1_255965523

Enterprise Social Network - holding the world in your hands

Changing the channel doesn’t change the world

I’ve been attending a few events recently about the various enterprise social network (ESN) platforms available to organisations to help them connect, collaborate and work out loud. These events are generally tailored towards organisations but even though I’m consulting now, I like to go along to learn about how different companies are using enterprise social, what successes they have seen and what lessons they have learnt.

During a Q&A session at the most recent event I attended, a question was asked that really got me thinking – “if the ESN we are using now isn’t working, how can we switch everything to a new platform to make it work again?” At Engage Squared, I spend my days talking to clients and helping them come up with strategies to engage with and adopt technology in the workplace and this question from another attendee sparked a million more in my mind:

“Why isn’t it working?”

“What have you tried to build engagement?”

“Do your employees understand the purpose for your ESN?”

There are a few enterprise social tools available to organisations and all of them are reasonably easy for an employee to use. With the ease of use and connection to these tools, it can’t be the channel for collaboration that needs to change, it’s the way that it’s used and simply changing the platform isn’t going to fix this problem. Sure, you’ll launch a new ESN, there’ll be some fanfare and the shiny new toy will get some great attention and use from employees for a few months but ultimately this enthusiasm will die off and so will use of the enterprise social network. Not even taking into consideration the time and money spent on the project to do this!

So, if you’re facing this challenge now – it might be low usage of your Yammer network or only one department posting messages on Workplace – think less about the collaboration tool you have being the reason and more about how you are using it. When tools have a place and a purpose within the corporate technology landscape, and employees can understand how and when they should be using them, it will give them the confidence to use an enterprise social network to its full potential!

Another important tip is not to rely on adoption to be driven from the bottom up. You need to have senior leadership support to drive real engagement from employees in enterprise social. Think of it this way, on LinkedIn the most prominent and successful business people have the most followers, comments, likes and mentions – imagine this in your organisation with your CEO! Now imagine how engaged employees would be with your enterprise social network if their CEO liked or even replied to their posts – that can turn an employee’s average day into a great one, just think about how valued that employee would feel!

Of course, it’s not as simple as just telling employees the business purpose and getting your CEO to click ‘like’ a few times to really see true adoption success on an enterprise social network. However, these are some key drivers for change and adoption in an organisation and by starting here you will begin to create a movement to work better, together!